Forum
SEARCH FORUM:
Facebook
Twitter
Googleplus
thisisdogwood
Style_council
thisisdogwood

So, there are a couple things that I’ve picked up on when I go thrifting, like how if some places are lacking in one area, they’re better off in another (like if the shirts suck, go check out the dresses). Any other tips?

posted over 11 years ago
karmie
Style_council
karmie

i guess this may be obvious, but go on offpeak hours like weekdays or whenever there aren’t many other shoppers..

posted over 11 years ago
 
leedaniel
Style_council
leedaniel

kinda obvious too, but thrift stores in rich cities have nicer things. they usually have stuff that would be from the shops of that neighborhood.
if it gets too overwhelming, limit yourself to shopping only for specific colors or items.

posted over 11 years ago
 
thisisdogwood
Style_council
thisisdogwood

yeah thrift stores in richer cities DO have nicer things, but they also have a lot more competition and people know what things are worth. Best place I’ve ever been for thrift shopping: Vermont.

posted over 11 years ago
 
ClothesHorse
Style_icon
ClothesHorse

My tip would be: always check the children’s section. Sometimes things end up there by mistake or they have great pieces that many people can squeeze into.
I also try to not find something specific, but see what I stumble across that speaks to me.

posted about 11 years ago
 
changology
Style_council
changology

Just walk into the thrift store with an open mind and purchase whatever feels right.

posted about 11 years ago
 
bugsybabs
Style_council
bugsybabs

This may be obvious too, but if you are really looking for something, keep going back, like twice a week. they may look at you weird, but you’ll probably find your bargain. And if it gets overwhelming, stick to only two sections during each trip. The areas you care most about at the time.

posted about 11 years ago
 
parapluie
Style_council
parapluie

I just came back from a trip to Las Vegas, and went thrifting in the suburbs—more specifically: Henderson, NV.
I found some really excellent things, and all because of the Number One Thrifting Rule: HAVE PATIENCE. If you take your time to scan through every single item in a section, you’ll find some real gems. (I found a gray wool Armani pencil skirt—it cost me $1.25!)
There were some really whacky things in that shop… I guess they were crazy Vegas-style cast-offs. :)

posted about 11 years ago
 
MichelleYue
Style_icon
MichelleYue

That hideous random ugly crazy thing. Try it on and it actually might look good. :D

posted about 11 years ago
 
TiffanyIma
Style_council
TiffanyIma

Don’t overlook things that most people would…a badly shaped dress with a sweet pattern can soon be a cute skirt. Go on a day when your patience level is high…if you are in a rush you won’t find much. If you don’t want to go overboard on spending, get cas h(like limit yourself to $15) and avoid buying things you end up never wearing anyway. You are forced to buy the things you absolutely love. Take your time! You will find it rewarding!

posted about 11 years ago
 
taylorjonas
Style_council
taylorjonas

thanks for the tips :)

posted almost 9 years ago
 
TupacTupacxo
Style_council
TupacTupacxo

Don’t check out for basics at thrift stores. Thrift stores are full of unique, colorful pieces :)

posted almost 9 years ago
 
EveyHoneysuckle
Style_council
EveyHoneysuckle

aaaaaannndddddd…bookmarked ;D

posted almost 9 years ago
 
angiekje
Style_council
angiekje

well ehm, I’m feeling so silly that I still don’t REALLY know exactly what a thrift store is :D I live in Belgium and I’m not sure if we have them. Is it a second hand store, or is there more to it?

posted almost 9 years ago
 
SaffronHaze
Style_council
SaffronHaze

Angie – yes, a thrift store is the same as an second hand store or opshop, consignment store etc.

posted almost 9 years ago
 
angiekje
Style_council
angiekje

thank you so much for clearifying that :D

posted almost 9 years ago
 
spunkychateau
Style_council
spunkychateau

Hi! I love buying in thrift stores. I try to go as often as I can. Remember to look everywhere! Some of my favorite pieces have come from the men’s side. I actually recently wrote a blog post on tips for thrift store shopping if anyone is interested!

http://spunkychateau.blogspot.com/2010/10/15-tips-for-thrift-store-shopping.html

posted almost 9 years ago
 
opfiend
Style_council
opfiend

Check the lingerie section for slips and camis. They look great peaking out of skirts, dresses, and tops. Also most thrift shops have sales so if you go often enough you can figure out what’s going to be on sale when.

posted almost 9 years ago
 
PeachyPanda
Style_council
PeachyPanda

the thrift store i frequent has certain days were its half off or 30% off everything so i go during those days and look through everything!

posted almost 9 years ago
 
GlammcouturE
Style_council
GlammcouturE

wow thanks for the tips!

posted almost 9 years ago
 
omgwtfjulesie
Style_council
omgwtfjulesie

I’ve been addicted to thrift shopping for a couple of years now and so my 80% of my humongous wardrobe is made up of thrifted/vintage items each costing less than 10 bucks. It’s really such an awesome way to shop and I’ve seriously just stopped going to malls now because I can’t be bothered with price tags >20 bucks.

Here’re some tips for those thinking of thrifting but don’t know how to start:

- Use Google and search out for thrift stores around your area. Put in a search like “vintage+thrift+stores+[location]” in Google or check out your local Vogue.com forums. A great way to organise your results would be to set up a Google Map and mark off all the spots you find; you can even write notes about the shop like directions and opening hours.
- As a general rule, most thrift stores open on Mondays – Fridays, 10 – 5p.m. Salvation Army opens on Saturdays though and if you’re in Australia, there are even some that’re open on Sundays.
- Bring shopping bags (some stores won’t provide plastic bags) and CASH ONLY.
- Keep your eyes OPEN when in a thrift store because you can find ANYTHING. Pull out anything that catches your eye in terms of colour, material, pattern, texture, etc because you’ll never know what you can find.
- For dresses/jackets/tops, it doesn’t really matter if you pick an item too big for you. You can always get it altered or follow the oversized trend.
- ALWAYS TRY SHOES ON BEFORE BUYING. I’ve had so many pairs that ended up too small or too big for me because I couldn’t be bothered to try.
- In my opinion, it would be best to go thrift shopping by yourself, especially if it’d your first few times. It’s a great way to scout out good locations to bring your friends to, and you won’t have the pressure of an impatient friend should you get lost.

These are just some tips I can think of right now. Hope these help!


Feel free to drop by my budget/vintage fashion blog at omgwtfjules.wordpress.com where I regularly post entries on my latest thrift stores finds, budget buys, commentary on fashion in general, and much more. :D

posted almost 9 years ago
 
photoboothkiller
Style_council
photoboothki...

I find the best stuff in thrift stores in the country- smaller towns where people aren’t as fashion conscious as they are in the city. The stores don’t get ransacked! For example, I found a vintage 1980’s Dior bag in a little country town, and they were selling it for $10 because they had no idea it was worth anything. My friends come to the town I live from the city just to go thrifting!

posted almost 9 years ago
 
Jazza
Style_council
Jazza

some pretty good tips here!
thanks :)

posted almost 9 years ago
 
CountryCityGirl
Style_council
CountryCityGirl

I LOVE a thrift store. My Tips:

1) Do a quick walk around the entire store before you really start browsing. This way you can make a mental map of areas to hit. They usually try to group like things together and so on. (But don’t be afraid to grab that item you think might work as you walk by!)

2) Use your eyes before your hands. I used to waste time going through a rack piece by piece only to have someone else walk up to the rack and pick out a hanger with something fabulous hanging on it. So, once you find a place to start, do an eyeball once-over THEN go back to look at each hanger.

3) Cultivate the ability to recognize quality fabric and odd details at a glance. Being able to spot a well made item just by looking at the item’s profile has gotten me some really nice things.

4) Dress in tights and wear a close fitting camisole under your shirt. Not all places have dressings or suitable dressing rooms.

5) If you find a place that always has a great selection offer to Volunteer there. You’ll be the first to see most of what comes in the store. If it’s a vintage store and not a Non-profit, ask if the owner would like a intern or do a service exchange. They need help sorting through loads of clothes and putting tags on items after a buying trip, offer to help in exchange for a discount. (But make sure you like their personality first!) Which leads to…

6) Get to know the owner, volunteers, whomever spends most of their time there. Go beyond knowing their names, find out if they drink coffee, read certain magazines etc…. If you shop at a small local non-profit store, the volunteers are there all day. If you occasionally have a copy of their favorite magazine or an extra $1 coffee from McDonald’s they will remember you. ( Get to know them first so they have confidence that you aren’t trying to poison them. It helps if you have pre-packaged candy too like gummy bears or jelly bellys)

7) Have a card you can drop with your likes, sizes whatever on the back. If they have a bulletin board they can call you when someone drops off an “old lady” donation. (I still believe the best way is to make a personal connection though.)

8) I agree with omgwtfjulemsie above. Google Maps is awesome. Once you’ve located your places to hit call ahead for times and policies. The stores in my city now take debit cards! About time. (But always have cash for backup.)

9) Find someone on the street and ask where the locals take their used clothing. Google Map though a godsend isn’t always the most reliable because it relies on someone communicating the information to them. Sure there may be a local Goodwill nearby … but, there might also be a avid flea marketer selling stuff in her barn! Believe! I know one.

10) Seek out stores when in a new place. I found vintage sewing patterns for 10 cents each once while away at a summer camp in High School. Now I am sure to Goggle thrift stores in the vicinity of any place I go to whether it’s vacation or visiting friends, or on the way to anywhere.

11) Yard Sales ! Flea Markets! Auctions! Estate Sales! Go!!!! Often listed in the paper or you could use a site like auctionzip.com, auctions are fun. Estate sales are my favorite. You can browse someone’s entire house and buy whatever catches your eye. And like yard sales and flea markets, the leftover items get cheaper and cheaper as the crowds die down.

I hope these help.

posted almost 9 years ago
 
annaandoldlace
Style_council
annaandoldlace

First and foremost, be patient. Frugal thrifting is accomplished by patience. I sometimes like to make a day out of it.

Second, don’t be afraid to try things on that aren’t your size. I found a fabulous blazer almost six sizes higher than I generally wear. Especially with vintage, not all sizing is created equal.

And lastly, don’t be afraid to try things that areo ut of the ordinary for you. What looks interesting or wacky on the hanger might look fantastic on you. It also might not, but it’ll help you get to know your thrift style.

posted almost 9 years ago
REPLY TO DISCUSSION
Please log in. Don't have an account? Sign up here.
Continue_with_facebook
or login below
Username
Password